“GIS is a toolkit for exploring the world.”

- Richard Audet,GIS in Schools

  Examples of GIS in Education  



PROJECT ONE TWO TREE

In Project One Two Tree, students from ten Rhode Island communities used GIS to map and analyze the trees on their school campus. Changes in Rhode Island’s state planning guidelines in the late 1990’s required every Rhode Island town to include an urban forestry component in its comprehensive plan, but few communities were prepared to do so. Through Project One Two Tree, Rhode Island students were able to help their communities meet this state mandate as they simultaneously learned about the urban ecosystem, and the value of spatial analysis in addressing community issues.
Source, Community Geography: GIS in Action.


  

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COMMUNITY ATLAS


ESRI's U.S. Community Atlas is a project in which teachers and students across the country define the nature of "their community" and post descriptions and maps about it on the internet. These presentations are combined on the Web server and can be searched by characteristic and explored for similarities and differences. Students in Barrington, RI discussed and compared their individual and shared perceptions of their community, then turned those discussions into a series of maps. In order to do that, they had to locate appropriate data and create maps that illustrated those ideas in a clear and informative way.
http://www.esri.com/industries/k-12/atlas/ribarrington/index.html                                        

  

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INFANT MORTALITY IN SUB SAHARAN AFRICA

In this scenario-based project, students were challenged to identify questions raised by the map of infant mortality rates in Sub Saharan Africa and to suggest causal factors that might contribute to the high IMR rates it reveals. Students role-played members of a World Health Organization team that has been charged with recommending programs to address the high IMR rates in Africa. In a GIS project that had already been created for them, students compared spatial patterns of infant mortality rates with spatial patterns of other variables including percent of the population with access to safe water, average number of calories consumed per day, percent of one year olds immunized against common childhood diseases, population per doctor, female literacy rate, male literacy rate, and per capita GNP. Based on their analysis of these potential causal factors, students recommended appropriate remedial programs in a summary report to the WHO.
  

IMR in Sub Saharan Africa

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